Sponsors Dublin City Council Arts Council of Ireland Fire Canon Ireland


Immigrant Artist Project New York

Through the Immigrant Artist Project (IAP), the New York Foundation for the Arts is building and serving a community of artists with diverse backgrounds who share the experience of immigration. We connect artists with services and resources to foster their creative careers, gain support and exposure for their work, and integrate into the cultural world of New York and beyond while upholding their distinct identities.

The free Con Edison IAP Newsletter is sent out via email and posted online every month. The newsletter lists information on upcoming opportunities and events of particular interest to immigrant artists but open to all. We also feature an artist or an arts/immigrant services organization, and helpful tips for professional development. Additionally, there are new sections on helpful tips translated into different languages as well as the Mentoring Alumni Corner to highlight the achievements and activities of past mentees of our Mentoring Program for Immigrant Artists.

Cultural Community Events expand the accessibility of the Immigrant Artist Project by offering instructional workshops, seminars, and panels on themes responsive to the needs of immigrant artists. Some topics include grant writing, legal services and marketing. To present these programs, we partner with cultural, advocacy, social and immigrant service organizations throughout New York City. This approach cultivates and strengthens a network of advocates and service providers for immigrant artists.

The Individual Consultation Initiative provides immigrant artists with practical and professional advice from an arts professional who has extensive experience in supporting artists in the areas of visual and performing arts. Each in-person appointment is $30 for a 30-minute session.

The Mentoring Program for Immigrant Artists pairs emerging foreign-born artists with artists who have received a NYFA Fellowship. The mentors interact with their mentees one-on-one for a period of six months, guiding them in achieving specific goals and providing them with broader access to the New York cultural world through an exchange of ideas, resources and experiences. The program helps immigrant artists build some necessary skills to fairly compete as professional artists in New York.

The NYFA Folk Artist Development Program helps senior members of immigrant communities build professional skills and resources to carry forward their traditional art forms. It is open to traditional artists of the material and/or performing arts. We build the capacity of participants through seminars, workshops, and individual consultations. We also provide them with the opportunity to showcase their traditions in demonstrations and performances for diverse audiences at various sites in the NYC area. Artists are provided a $100 stipend for their participation in the program.

Phone: 212-366-6900 x249
New York Foundation for the Arts
20 Jay St, Suite 740, Brooklyn NY 11201

The Gathering – Ireland 2013

Whether you’re Irish born, Irish bred or Irish in spirit, get involved & celebrate a year of Irish connections – The Gathering Ireland 2013!

Festivals and events

The Gathering will bring together hundreds of festivals and events throughout Ireland during 2013. They will celebrate the best in Irish music, art, literature, dance, culture, heritage, sport, film and food.

Fantastic New Year’s Eve Festivals will bookend the year, ensuring that 2013 both starts and ends with a bang! In between, take your pick from events such as St Patrick’s Festival, the Galway Arts Festival, the Wexford Opera Festival and Temple Bar TradFest, to name but a few. These will be familiar to many people but in 2013 they will all offer exciting new elements, making them bigger and better than ever for those visiting for The Gathering.

Great Gathering ideas

There are so many ways to get involved in The Gathering Ireland 2013. From family reunions to community festivals and twin towns to alumni gatherings, everyone is encouraged to work together to organise and host get-togethers. Reach out to your networks and connections overseas and invite them to come and visit in 2013. Here are some ideas…

Tracing your roots

There is a global Irish diaspora of 70 million. Are you one of them? Instead of waiting for you to find us, we’re inviting you back for The Gathering Ireland 2013. It might just be the perfect time to come and find out more about your forefathers and forge a deeper connection with our country.

When you start researching your family history, you never know what you’re going to find. And with no fewer than four recent US presidents claiming Irish family connections, the chances of discovering an influential relative are not as slim as they might at first seem!

In addition to the 1.3 million church records available online, there are national repositories of material, as well as local heritage and genealogy centres around the country. Download our guide, Tracing Your Ancestors (2.5MB .pdf) to get started or check out: www.irishgenealogy.ie, www.rootsireland.ie and www.nationalarchives.ie

You can also celebrate your Irish roots and honour your Irish ancestors by getting an official Certificate of Irish Heritage. These certs are issued by the Irish Government to those who have at least one Irish ancestor. You will even be offered help to track down the documents required to apply for the cert. In practice, that almost amounts to a free start on tracing your roots! Find out more at: www.heritagecertificate.ie

We hope this will be a chance for you to feel closer to Ireland and meet family that you never knew existed.

Dublin city holds most immigrants

map of Dublin's population born abroad

According to The Irish Times (article by Pamela Duncan) people born outside Ireland now make up more than two-thirds of the population of the area around O’Connell Street, at the centre of Dublin City, according to a breakdown of the latest census statistics.

The electoral division in and around the GPO and O’Connell Street has the highest percentage of people born abroad living in any area in Ireland, with almost 70 per cent of the population of the North City electoral division born outside Ireland.

The electoral division, bordered by the Liffey to the south and Parnell Street to the north, has a population of 5,345 according to the latest census, which was carried out in April 2011.

It is one of six areas in Dublin city centre where the non-Irish resident population now stands at more than 50 per cent, according to an in-depth breakdown of figures from the Central Statistics Office (CSO) census by the All Island Research Observatory, a research unit and interactive spatial data portal based at NUI, Maynooth.

The 2011 census showed almost a third of people born outside Ireland live in Dublin. There are now 218,653 non-Irish born nationals living in Dublin, meaning one in five people living in the capital was born abroad. Despite this, some parts of the city and county remain almost entirely Dublin-born.

The highest population of Dublin-born residents are in the Kylemore, Carna, Drumfinn and Decies electoral districts in Ballyfermot, where up to 93 per cent of the population was born within Dublin.

Other areas where more than 90 per cent of residents are Dublin-born include four electoral divisions within the Finglas area; the Kilmore C division of Coolock, bordered by the Northside Shopping Centre on one side and the Cadbury plant off the Malahide Road on the other; and the electoral divisions of Clondalkin-Rowlagh and Priorswood B.

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